Flow regulation and drought drive riparian plant invasion

Ecologists, like epidemiologists, are often confronted with the challenge of trying to determine causality by piecing together bits of information observed in nature. When the presence or absence of a species at a site is affected by the characteristics of the environment and community, the availability and dispersal success of propagules, stochastic events and the peculiarities of the species itself, it can be very difficult to isolate the likely mechanisms that lead to the occurrence – or lack thereof – of a particular species, especially when the influential factors are highly correlated.

The joys of being in control.  (Source: thecampaignworkshop.com)
The joys of being in control.
(Source: thecampaignworkshop.com)

Experiments are obviously made for getting around such problems; by controlling and isolating one factor at a time, the relative importance of different factors can be quantified. However, experiments are not always possible, desirable or ethical. Take plant invasions along rivers, for example: they occur at large spatial and temporal scales; many factors may drive the invasion process; introducing and augmenting the supply of invasive species is unpalatable and likely prohibited; plus, river environments are very hard to control and manipulate, as any manager will tell you. So, if we are limited to potentially confounded survey data, how can we more effectively identify the drivers of plant invasion so that we know which factors to target in weed management?

In a paper recently published in Diversity and Distributions, my colleagues and I contend that incorporating data about species characteristics into survey-based approaches provides an additional line of evidence that can be used to improve inferences drawn from patterns. We illustrate how using information about environmental gradients, species distributions and species characteristics can increase understanding of ecological phenomena – here, riparian plant invasion, which can help inform management responses.

Using this approach, we find that, of four hypotheses examined, hydrological modification (indicated by flood magnitude) most likely drives invasion in River Murray wetlands. Flow regulation may inhibit native species adapted to the historical hydrological regime, facilitating exotic species with different environmental ranges. A symptom of environmental change, invasion may have been exacerbated by drought, although it is unclear why.

By hitching a ride on walkers' shoes and boots, exotic plants may even invade places like this.  Columbia River Valley, Oregon. (Source: JAC).
By hitching a ride on walkers’ boots, exotic plants may even invade places like this.
Columbia River Valley, Oregon. (Source: JAC).

There was no indication that human-increased propagule pressure or colonisation ability facilitated invasion. Exotic cover was unrelated to proximity to towns, recent flood frequency and cattle grazing intensity. Additionally, similar proportions of exotic and native species were used in cultivation and, despite a higher proportion of exotics being known weeds, weed status was unrelated to exotic species occupancy. Overall, colonisation ability was unrelated to species’ origin or response to water depth and hydrological change. Although exotics had higher specific leaf area and shorter longevity (indicative of higher colonisation ability), they had heavier (not lighter) seeds and did not differ in height from natives.

Based on our findings, we conclude that (i) using environmental flows to reinstate mid-range floods and (ii) augmenting the propagule supply of native species with characteristics suitable for modified conditions may help limit invasion in these wetlands.

For more, have a look here or drop me a line and I’ll send you a copy. I’d be delighted to hear any thoughts, comments or queries that you may have.

Bringing resilience back to its ecological roots

Resilience, along with its sister term, resistance, is among the first ecological concepts taught to ecology undergraduates and remains central to conceiving how ecosystems cope – or do not – with environmental change. Despite its potential importance to conservation decisions and environmental management, confusion about how to define and measure resilience has impeded its application.

In an effort to reclaim the utility of resilience, Rachel Standish (UWA), Nancy Shackelford (Victoria Uni., Canada) and I brought 20 community ecologists together with the aim of quantifying ecosystem resilience and identifying the characteristics associated with it. Using experimental data gathered from around the world, we will compare the extent and speed of recovery of different ecosystems from different types of disturbance.  In doing so, we intend to learn more about resilience and make its application to ecosystem management more feasible. More information. 

Working hard at Rottnest Island, December 2013
Working hard at Rottnest Island, CEED Workshop, December 2013
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