The divine glory of our nation’s capital

It may come as a shock to some people, but I am delighted to say that Canberra is now my home.

For those who aren’t so familiar with Australian snobbery, Canberra (along with our South Australian sister, (R)Adelaide) tends to get a pretty bad rap. Boring; nothing to do; weird; where are the milk bars?!

While I nod my head appreciably at the last comment (and, dare I say, groovy wine bars?!), the first few seem to come from people who a) have never been to Canberra, b) came once during primary school to visit Parliament House or c) have very poor taste.

My response to this:

  • fast, flowing mountain bike trails winding through beautiful grassy woodland all of ten minutes from Canberra’s CBD;
  • Two hours to the coast, two hours to the mountains;
  • And then there are the after work strolls with kangaroos, kookaburras, cockatoos, wallabies, rosellas…

    What I did at the weekend: Canberra to Kosciuszko by bike. Photo by Milly Brent

Clearly, I am a “nature lover” (surprising, I know) and Canberra offers “nature” in droves. As well as being great for one’s physical and mental wellbeing, this also presents some great work opportunities as the field really isn’t that far away. To illustrate, I’ll briefly introduce a couple of the field sites where some of my colleagues in the Fenner School of Environment and Society work.

Mulligans Flat–Goorooyarroo Woodland Experiment

MulligansExperiment fig
Response variables being studied in the woodland experiment: 1 Dead wood; 2 Birds; 3 Invertebrates; 4 Vegetation; 5 Reptiles; 6 Fungi; 7 Bettong reintroduction; 8 Brown Treecreeper reintroduction; 9 Kangaroos; 10 Small mammals; 11 Litter, soil and soil microbes; 12 Exclusion of feral pests. See link to the left for source info.

Located in a couple of nature reserves 15 km north of central Canberra, the Mulligans Flat–Goorooyarroo Woodland Experiment is a partnership between the Australian National University, the ACT Government and CSIRO. The aim of the project is to find ways of improving box-gum grassy woodland for biodiversity and the experiment manipulates and monitors a whole raft of factors (see figure above).

One of the many exciting aspects of this experiment is the reintroduction of the Tasmanian Bettong (Bettongia gaimardi) – it has been extinct from the mainland of Australia for 80 years.  Regarded as an ecosystem engineer, it will be interesting to learn what effects the Bettong has on the ecosystem.

Tumut Fragmentation Study

Based in the Buccleuch State Forest 100 km west of Canberra, the idea for the Tumut Fragmentation Experiment was sparked when David Lindenmayer was flying from Canberra to Melbourne. Peering out of the plane window, David saw an area of native forest that had been cleared for a radiata pine (Pinus radiata) plantation. Rather than just bulldozing the whole lot of it though, patches of native forest had been left. Representative of the original forest, these patches varied in size from half a hectare to 200 hectares thus providing a great way to study effects of forest fragmentation on biodiversity.

The Tasmanian Bettong (Bettongia gaimardi). Photo by JJ Harrison (jjharrison@facebook.com)
The Tasmanian Bettong (Bettongia gaimardi). Photo by JJ Harrison (jjharrison@facebook.com)

In all, the Conservation and Landscape Ecology group at Fenner run seven large-scale longitudinal field studies, all located in south eastern Australia. Long-term, large-scale ecological studies are pretty rare in Australia, yet provide incredibly valuable insights because many ecological processes occur at the landscape-scale, it can take a long time for ecosystems to respond to certain actions and it can also be very hard to detect ecological responses when background levels of variability are so high (just think of weather patterns versus climate change). A major impediment to establishing long-term studies is the fact that most grants last for only a few years. While there is increasing support and appreciation of long-term studies (the merits of which are nicely illustrated by the Long Term Ecological Research Network in the US), many researchers rely on passion, strong working relationships and cheap labour (i.e. their own) to maintain such research.

I have been in the Fenner School at the Australian National University for a few months now and I am just loving it. Although I am still employed by the University of Melbourne and retain strong links with the Quantitative and Applied Ecology research group, I will be based here for the duration of my grant and hopefully, fingers crossed, beyond that.

If you are ever in town, or are keen to visit, please drop me a line. We could even go to Parliament House.

Parliament House. Source: Milly Brent
Parliament House. Source: Milly Brent

Project kick-off: propagule pressure, functional traits, resource availability and plant invasion

As mentioned in a previous post, I was lucky enough to be awarded one of the inaugural ARC Discovery Early Career Researcher Awards (DECRA) late last year. I officially started my DECRA research in April, so I thought it was time that I introduce it – albeit rather briefly.

In essence, I am planning to investigate the susceptibility of native vegetation edges to alien plant invasion using quantitative and experimental approaches.  The project will contain both theoretical and applied elements and will primarily examine plant invasion through a community ecology lens (or is it community assembly through an invasion lens??!).

I’ll specifically be looking at the combined (and interactive) effects of species traits, resource availability and propagule pressure on invasion success using Bayesian meta-analysis, causal modelling and a field experiment.  As stated in my grant application, “disentangling effects of alien species’ seed supply, high resource availability (light, water, nutrients) and species’ traits on invasion will indicate their relative influence on plant invasion and community assembly.  As a result, new knowledge will be gained on the efficacy of invasive species prevention and control by indicating which invasion pathways to target, and under what conditions.”

The project will run for three years and I’ll be splitting my time between Australia and the US to achieve it. The plan is to work with CEED/NERP folk on the more quantitative aspects of the project while in Australia (principally with people like Brendan Wintle, Cindy Hauser, Mick McCarthy and Peter Vesk in the QAEcology group at Melbourne Uni, but also with Phil Gibbons and David Lindenmayer at the Australian National University; more on that later). I’ll conduct the experiment at Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve in Minnesota working with David Tilman.  I’m planning to spend two months at the University of Minnesota this year (July-August) and then 6 months for the following two years (roughly April-Sept/Oct).  As a lover of warm weather, an endless summer comes as an added bonus!

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